Daniel Inouye – Biographical Profile and Positions on the Issues

Previous Candidate for U.S. Senator, Hawaii

Democratic Party of Hawaii
www.daninouyehawaii.comwww.daninouyehawaii.com
300 Ala Moana Boulevard, Room 7-212Honolulu, HI 96850
808.541.2542
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Biographical
General (political statement of goals, objectives, views, philosophies)

Daniel K. Inouye, the third most senior member of the U.S. Senate, is known for his distinguished record as a legislative leader, and as a World War II combat veteran who earned the nation's highest award for military valor, the Medal of Honor.

Although he was thrust into the limelight in the 1970s as a member of the Watergate Committee and in 1987 as Chairman of the Iran-Contra Committee, he has also quietly made his mark as a respected legislator able to work in a bipartisan fashion to enact meaningful legislation.

As the ranking Democrat on the Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, Senator Inouye has been able to focus on defense matters that strengthen national security, and enhance the quality of life for military personnel and their families. This reflects his hope for a more secure world, and his desire to provide the best possible assistance to the men and women who put their lives at risk to protect the United States.

Senator Inouye has also championed the interests of Hawaii's people throughout his career. He was instrumental in engineering the restoration and return of Kahoolawe, the island that had been used for target practice by the U.S. military, to the State of Hawaii. He continues to press for the passage of legislation that would establish a process by which Hawaii's indigenous people would be able to form their own sovereign government.

Senator Inouye also continues to push for improved education and healthcare for all children, additional jobs for Hawaii's economy, health and human services in rural communities, affordable housing, and the protection of the nation's natural resources. He was instrumental in setting the groundwork for the National Park Service's acquisition of approximately 115,000 acres of the Kahuku Ranch in Kau to expand the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. The initiative is key to protecting rare and endangered bird and mammal species found in the varied habitats of Kahuku Ranch.

As Co-chairman of th [Response was truncated to maximum response length of 2000 characters.]

Personal (gender, age, marital status, spouse's name and age, children's name and ages, home town, current residence)

September 7, 1924. Born, the eldest of four children, to Hyotaro and Kame Inouye.

The son of Japanese immigrants, Dan Inouye was born and raised in Honolulu.

1948. Married Margaret Shinobu Awamura.

Education (times and places of schools, colleges, major, degrees, activities, sports)

1942. Graduated from McKinley High School.

With financial assistance from the G.I. Bill, Inouye graduated from the University of Hawaii and the George Washington University Law School.

1950. Graduated from the University of Hawaii with a B.A. degree in economics and government.

1952. Graduated from George Washington University Law School with a J.D. degree.

Military (branch, years of service, active duty experience, highest rank, medals, honors, type and date of discharge)

In March 1943, 18-year-old Dan Inouye, then a freshman in pre-medical studies at the University of Hawaii and long eager to join the U.S. war effort, enlisted in the U.S. Army's 442nd Regimental Combat Team, the famed "Go for Broke" regiment of soldiers of Japanese ancestry.

Inouye was soon promoted to the rank of Sergeant, and was designated a combat platoon leader during the Italian campaign. He slogged through nearly three bloody months of the Rome Arno campaign with the U.S. Fifth Army.

In the fall of 1944, Inouye's unit was shifted to the French Vosges Mountains and spent two of the bloodiest weeks of the war rescuing a Texas battalion surrounded by German forces. The rescue of the "Lost Battalion" is listed in U.S. Army annals as one of the most significant military battles of the century. Inouye lost 10 pounds, became a platoon leader, and was awarded the Bronze Star and a battlefield commission as a Second Lieutenant, as he and other Japanese-Americans continued to fight with unmatched courage that would eventually result with the 442nd being the most decorated unit in U.S. military history for its size and length of service.

Back in Italy as the war was drawing to a close, Inouye displayed "extraordinary heroism" on April 21, 1945, near San Terenzo as he led his platoon through "formidable resistance" to capture a key ridge. His Medal of Honor Citation states in part: "With complete disregard for his personal safety, Second Lieutenant Inouye crawled up the treacherous slope to within five yards of the nearest machine gun and hurled two grenades, destroying the emplacement. Before the enemy could retaliate, he stood up and neutralized a second machine gun nest. Although wounded by a sniper's bullet, he continued to engage other hostile positions at close range until an exploding grenade shattered his right arm. Despite the intense pain, he refused evacuation and continued to direct his platoon until enemy resistance was broken and his men were a [Response was truncated to maximum response length of 2000 characters.]

Political (dates and titles of previously held political offices)

Majority leader of the Territorial House of Representatives

Eight-term U.S. Senator; second most-senior member of the U.S. Senate

Chairman, U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations

Senior member of Commerce, Rules and Indian Affairs Committees

Religion (current and past religious affiliations, beliefs)

Methodist

Accomplishments (significant accomplishments, awards, achievements)

On May 27, 1947, Inouye was honorably discharged with the rank of Captain, and returned home with a Distinguished Service Cross, the nation's second highest award for military valor, along with a Bronze Star, Purple Heart with cluster, and 12 other medals and citations.

Although he was thrust into the limelight in the 1970s as a member of the Watergate Committee and in 1987 as Chairman of the Iran-Contra Committee, he has also quietly made his mark as a respected legislator able to work in a bipartisan fashion to enact meaningful legislation.

As the ranking Democrat on the Senate Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, Senator Inouye has been able to focus on defense matters that strengthen national security, and enhance the quality of life for military personnel and their families.

Courts, Laws & Justice
Supreme Court

"I had the privilege and honor of meeting with Judge Roberts. I was impressed by his legal scholarship, but expressed a hope that he would be forthright and open with the American people as he progressed through the Senate confirmation process. Although I must regretfully conclude that there are still questions outstanding on Judge Roberts' record, in light of the urgency of ensuring that our nation's Supreme Court has its full complement of justices, I agree with my Democratic and Republican colleagues that his nomination should be given an up-or-down vote.

"I have studied the development of the Supreme Court by our Founding Fathers, and it is apparent to me that our nation's leaders did not want this group of citizens to be subjected to the political pressures of the day, so they provided for lifetime appointments, with no termination date. Further, candidates were not required to be lawyers, perhaps as a reminder that legal brilliance alone does not qualify a man or woman to sit on the bench of our highest court. Integrity, compassion, and wisdom are also required in equal -- or perhaps greater -- measure.

"Reconciling lifetime appointments with the demands of democratic elections, created understandable consternation. After much debate, our Founding Fathers provided that the Executive and Legislative Branches of our federal government would employ every means available to them to make certain that the selection is a wise one, and one that a nation could live with for the lifetime of the judge. Today, we walk again the careful path laid out by the Founding Fathers to ensure for the American people that Judge Roberts is a man worthy of their trust.

"Fully realizing that Judge Roberts will most certainly receive substantial support from the United States Senate, I will cast my vote against this appointment. I do not object to Judge Roberts' politics, nor do I object to his personal beliefs. Our Democracy guarantees him both the freedom to think and speak as [Response was truncated to maximum response length of 2000 characters.]

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

Economy
Stimulating the Economy

As Chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, working with the House and the Obama Administration, I tried my best to craft the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to put people back to work, invest in critical infrastructure such as roads and schools, prevent cuts to basic services, reduce the tax burden on working families, and then to position our nation for the future in the areas of renewable energy and broadband connectivity that will help enable our economy to thrive once again. I always had one eye firmly on my beloved Hawaii to be sure that we not only got at least our fair share, but have a strategic plan of action to compete for additional federal funds.

The total formula funding for Hawaii in the Economic Stimulus package is $718 million. This includes funding for roads, public housing, wastewater systems, education and social services. In addition, Hawaii will also receive $520 million to our federal agencies for among other things, military construction projects, increased healthcare services at the community healthcare centers, harbor dredging, federal building upgrades, National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service property upgrades, and airport security investments. I am also awaiting the public announcement by the National Science Foundation for $150 million to build the ATST, the largest solar telescope in the world, atop Haleakala. This will be a boost to Maui's economy and its scientific community. The federal economic stimulus investments will continue.

Lastly, Hawaii is benefitting from tax-related benefits including $30 million to pay for additional unemployment compensation benefits; $360 million to increase the federal share of Medicaid payments; and $300 million in reduced tax burdens for about 500,000 workers in Hawaii. To date, the federal investment through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act has already exceeded $2 billion. (

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/10/2011)

Education
Art and Music

Polynesian Voyaging Center. The Polynesian Voyaging Center provides cultural education programs geared towards enhancing leadership skills and cultural knowledge through ocean voyaging. With a legacy of ocean exploration as its foundation, $431,000 has been provided to support voyages of discovery; foster respect and learning about Native Hawaiian heritage and culture; and strengthen learning through the integration of voyaging, science and culture experiences into quality educational opportunities.

Education through Cultural and Historical Education (ECHO). Provided in excess of $11.6 million in support of the ECHO program, managed by the Bishop Museum, to foster innovative culture-based learning. These educational programs, shared through partnerships with four mainland states and Alaska, embraces cultural exchanges between schools, museums, and communities.

Native Hawaiian Culture and Arts Program (NHCAP). NHCAP was authorized in 1984 to provide a greater sense of cultural awareness and ethnic pride essential to the survival of the Native Hawaiian people. $6.8 million has been appropriated to support this effort. NHCAP's efforts are focused on encouraging Hawaiians to preserve and practice their traditions in a rapidly changing multi-cultural world, and to share and celebrate Hawaiian art and culture with the broader state, national and international community.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Special Education

The U.S. Department of Education provides approximately $42 million annually to assist with the education of children with special needs. Following the state court ordered special education services, state expenditures had to increase. The federal dollars help ease the state's duty to provide significant additional resources for children with special needs. An additional $43 million was provided in the economic stimulus.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Public Schools K-12

I am a proud graduate of McKinley High School. My son, Kenny, went to Maryland's public schools, and my first wife, Maggie, a graduate of Roosevelt High School, was a teacher. I wholeheartedly believe in our system of public education system. I will continue to do all that I can to assist our schools in providing quality educational opportunities for our children, and to support our teachers and principals with the resources they need to do their jobs. Rather than sit back and be critical, we must lean forward and ask, "How can I help?" It is our collective community responsibility.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Teacher Standards

Federal support for teacher quality amounts to about $14 million annually. In addition, about $28 million is provided each year to the Hawaii Department of Education for upgrades in education technology, math and science, the tracking of student assessments, and for vocational and career educational programming.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Higher Education

I am a proud graduate of the University of Hawaii, greatly benefiting from the GI Bill after returning home after World War II. In the subsequent generations however, there was almost a sense of resignation that a son or daughter "ended up" at the University. No more. We have worked hard to establish excellence in a variety of disciplines from oceanography, volcanology, astronomy, to Hawaiian studies and language. Our law school, medical, nursing and pharmacy schools and our business school attract top-notch faculty and students which ensure a trained cadre of Hawaii professionals to address the needs in our community. The University's statewide community colleges provide training to meet our diverse employment needs from construction, tourism, healthcare to computer sciences. I am pleased to support the University's many good works which raise our collective educational base. Whether 2-year or doctorate, we must prepare our students to achieve to their fullest and to become contributing members of the community. That is done with education, self-confidence and hope.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Adult Education

Rural Development Project (RDP). Managed by the University of Hawaii community colleges, over 22,000 people have been positively impacted -- firemen, police recruits, lifeguards, school custodians, UXO workers, Pearl Harbor Shipyard and Pacific Missile Range workers, nurses and nurse assistants, dialysis workers, teachers, information tech workers, construction trades and culinary/food service workers.

Imiloa Astronomy Center. The Center is a celebration of Hawaiian culture and Mauna Kea astronomy -- all combined to bring a vibrant educational experience to Hawaii's youth.

Science Education Pilot Program. In Hawaii there is a unique opportunity to use the oceans and beaches as a "living science classroom." The program simultaneously strengthens the Hawaii Department of Education's science curriculum offerings and encourages students to pursue math and science fields.

The Bay Watershed Education and Training Program (B-WET). B-WET strives to take advantage of Hawaii's natural beauty as a classroom while helping Hawaii's next generation become knowledgeable about the environment.

Women in Technology Project. Begun in 2000 as a Maui island pilot, the program has expanded to serve more than 6,000 statewide participants annually, including regional partnerships and has received $9 million in funding over the past 10 years.

East-West Center. 50 years ago, Congress established the East-West Center to foster stronger relations between the United States and its neighbors in the Asia - Pacific region.

Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard's Apprenticeship Program. As Hawaii's largest industrial employer with a proud history, the Shipyard provides vocational opportunities for many in Hawaii.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Community Colleges

Our law school, medical, nursing and pharmacy schools and our business school attract top-notch faculty and students which ensure a trained cadre of Hawaii professionals to address the needs in our community. The University's statewide community colleges provide training to meet our diverse employment needs from construction, tourism, healthcare to computer sciences.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Student Loans, Scholarships and Pell Grants

Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard's Apprenticeship Program. As Hawaii's largest industrial employer with a proud history that earned the motto: "We Keep Them Fit to Fight," the Shipyard provides vocational and specialized opportunities for the people of Hawaii. The $17.2 million investment in the Shipyard's revitalized and flourishing Apprentice Program gives Hawaii's next generation an opportunity to further their education and skills here at home. In addition, the over $715 million support for the Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard demonstrates its tremendous value as an asset to the Navy's broad-spectrum capabilities protecting Hawaii, and strengthening our national security in the Asia - Pacific region.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Student Standards

Title I is a national education program which assists underachieving children from low-income communities. Annually Hawaii receives approximately $46 million to provide additional resources including remedial materials, additional teachers, specialized programs to support basic ready and math, as well as after-school homework support and tutors to help keep children from disadvantaged home settings from falling behind their peers. Hawaii received an additional $33 million this year in economic stimulus funds for Title I programs.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Department of Education

The Departments of Agriculture, Education, and Housing and Urban Development each administer an Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions program. Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions such as Chaminade University, University of Hawaii at Hilo, and all of the community colleges under the University of Hawaii system have received a total of $83.1 million over the past 10 years. Programs are not limited to Native Hawaiian initiatives but rather support programs and students across the board.

Under the Department of Agriculture, the University of Hawaii established an Agribusiness Education, Training and Incubator project to build capacity and entrepreneurship among Hawaii's rural agriculture communities, including Native Hawaiian and other traditionally underserved minority populations.

Under the Department of Education, these funds are used by the University of Hawaii system and Chaminade University to support the education of Native Hawaiians. Initiatives include research lab renovations, establishing a nursing degree program, developing various retention programs that focus on STEM subject areas to reduce numbers of dropouts, lab renovations to develop a state of the art music production center, and a Pacific Islander education retention program.

Under the Department of Housing and Urban Development, funds are used by eligible institutions of higher education to expand their capacity to serve low income students and strengthen academic curricula, and provide for community development. For example, funds have been used for building multi-media and computer labs, certified kitchens, and a cultural learning center.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Rural Schools

Secured $335.2 million dollars over 10 years for Native Hawaiian education initiatives focusing on early and pre-school education; Hawaiian language immersion curriculum; recruitment and retention of Native Hawaiian teachers; programs targeted to improve literacy, math and science skills, language arts, the social studies; higher education scholarships; gifted and talented programming; vocational education; and culturally targeted drug prevention and education.

This includes the Ke Huli Ao Native Hawaiian Law School Center of Excellence at the University of Hawaii to facilitate discourse between the legal community, the Native Hawaiian community, and the community at large. It promotes education, research, and scholarship on the unique aspects of Native Hawaiian law, including the intersection between local, federal, and international laws affecting Native Hawaiians. It also offers new courses and supports Native Hawaiian and other law students as they pursue legal careers and leadership roles.

Other recent grantees include Partners in Development, Kanu o Ka Aina Learning Ohana, Pacific American Foundation, University of Hawaii-Maui Community College, Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture, Kaala Farm, University of Hawaii, Ke Kula o Samuel Kamakau, Mano Maoli, Alu Like Inc., Project Nana i ka pulapula, and Hoola Lahui Hawaii.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Education, a General Statement

Educating our children is the greatest investment we can make in our future. While we cannot know all of the challenges they will face, we can give them the tools to be successful, and to grow a stronger, more sustainable Hawaii.

I wholeheartedly believe in our system of public education system. I will continue to do all that I can to assist our schools in providing quality educational opportunities for our children, and to support our teachers and principals with the resources they need to do their jobs. Rather than sit back and be critical, we must lean forward and ask, "How can I help?" It is our collective community responsibility.

I am also a proud graduate of the University of Hawaii, greatly benefiting from the GI Bill after returning home after World War II. In the subsequent generations however, there was almost a sense of resignation that a son or daughter "ended up" at the University. No more. We have worked hard to establish excellence in a variety of disciplines from oceanography, volcanology, astronomy, to Hawaiian studies and language. Our law school, medical, nursing and pharmacy schools and our business school attract top-notch faculty and students which ensure a trained cadre of Hawaii professionals to address the needs in our community. The University's statewide community colleges provide training to meet our diverse employment needs from construction, tourism, healthcare to computer sciences. I am pleased to support the University's many good works which raise our collective educational base. Whether 2-year or doctorate, we must prepare our students to achieve to their fullest and to become contributing members of the community. That is done with education, self-confidence and hope.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Energy, Gas, Oil & Autos
Renewable Energy, Solar, Biomass and Wind

Hawaii - New Mexico Partnership. In 2006, Senator Pete Domenici of New Mexico and I started the Hawaii-New Mexico Partnership. The results addressed both the system integration/grid stability of taking significantly more renewable energy, as well as institutional issues like the need for easier execution of power purchase agreements with third-party renewable energy operators. These efforts continue to validate the islands' renewable energy road maps. This will include testing the impact of high wind penetration on Maui and Oahu, significant increases in geothermal energy on the Big Island, and the large-scale integration of photovoltaic on all islands.

Hawaii Renewable Energy Development Venture (HREDV). To further pursue and encourage the potential for clean energy enterprises in Hawaii, I requested U.S. Department of Energy support to develop a larger, more robust and sustainable clean energy sector in Hawaii. This new program began in 2008 with $1.2 million and an additional $3.8 million in 2009. Additionally, HREDV will solicit proposals for potential co-investment from the private sector. Targeted areas will include renewable energy technologies, energy efficiency, and clean energy-based transportation fuels and systems. Follow-on efforts will include promoting coordination between renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and water resources management.

Tropical Feedstocks and Biomass Conversion. This project focuses on developing efficient biomass production and its conversion into useable energy. Our unique tropical conditions and year-round growing season make Hawaii an ideal location to address biomass energy development which also offers new opportunities for Hawaii's agricultural sector, support rural employment, and promotes a greater level of environmental quality. During the current year, new crops being addressed are energy cane, fast growing trees, and plants that can grow in arid conditions.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Energy, a General Statement

Hawaii remains the state most dependent on imported oil. About 90% of our energy needs are satisfied with imported oil, creating severe economic and security challenges. At the same time, Hawaii has a wide variety of renewable energy resources, the development of which will not only reduce oil dependence, but result in lasting environmental benefits, and energy self-sufficiency.

We must not falter this time around in accepting more distributed renewable and clean energy into the grid, such as wind, photovoltaic, geothermal, and biofuels. To do so, we must provide a level of certainty in the amount of renewables the utility will accept and at what price, as well as de-linking utility revenues and electricity profits to encourage conservation, demand-side management, and third-party owned renewable energy systems. We must pursue alternative transportation fuels and electric vehicles. We must also provide greater incentives for energy conservation and demand reduction.

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative is an important step in furtherance of our commitment to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. This ambitious goal is a full-scale transformation of Hawaii's energy system to 70% clean energy by 2030. It requires significant public and private investment, and an overarching political will to succeed. Over the past five years alone, more than $125 million has come to Hawaii from the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy to support a host of research, development and energy efficiency programs. We are a national leader in this area with a host of renewable energy technologies to test, perfect and implement.

I am pleased with the federal investments to date and will continue to provide an increased level of funding to ensure that we stay the course, and once and for all, reduce our dependency on foreign oil. It is our duty to the next generation.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Hybrid & All Electric Cars

About $10 million has been spent over the years to both demonstrate and implement the following:

* The first fuel cell vehicle -- a 30 foot bus for Hickam shuttle service in operation within the Air Force and the State. It is a hybrid with a small fuel cell and a large battery pack.

* The first modular, deployable hydrogen production and fueling station to produce hydrogen and dispenses it into vehicles. The station is capable of producing 48 kg of hydrogen a day.

* A fleet of operational fuel cell vehicles at Hickam -- cars, vans, refueler.

* Solar and wind energy sources are being installed to produce renewable hydrogen. Photovoltaic arrays and wind turbines produce hydrogen with an annual electric cost savings. The cost savings with an operational photovoltaic array were about $43,500 in 2008.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Energy Independence from Foreign Oil

Hawaii remains the state most dependent on imported oil. About 90% of our energy needs are satisfied with imported oil, creating severe economic and security challenges. At the same time, Hawaii has a wide variety of renewable energy resources, the development of which will not only reduce oil dependence, but result in lasting environmental benefits, and energy self-sufficiency.

We must not falter this time around in accepting more distributed renewable and clean energy into the grid, such as wind, photovoltaic, geothermal, and biofuels. To do so, we must provide a level of certainty in the amount of renewables the utility will accept and at what price, as well as de-linking utility revenues and electricity profits to encourage conservation, demand-side management, and third-party owned renewable energy systems. We must pursue alternative transportation fuels and electric vehicles. We must also provide greater incentives for energy conservation and demand reduction.

The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative is an important step in furtherance of our commitment to reduce our dependency on foreign oil. This ambitious goal is a full-scale transformation of Hawaii's energy system to 70% clean energy by 2030. It requires significant public and private investment, and an overarching political will to succeed. Over the past five years alone, more than $125 million has come to Hawaii from the U.S. Departments of Defense and Energy to support a host of research, development and energy efficiency programs. We are a national leader in this area with a host of renewable energy technologies to test, perfect and implement.

I am pleased with the federal investments to date and will continue to provide an increased level of funding to ensure that we stay the course, and once and for all, reduce our dependency on foreign oil. It is our duty to the next generation.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Energy Research and Development

Hawaii Energy and Environmental Technology Initiative. In 2002, I worked to secure funding from the Office of Naval Research for the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute of the University of Hawaii (UH) to establish the Hawaii Energy and Environmental Technology Initiative to address critical technology needs associated with the exploration and utilization of seabed methane hydrates, and the development and testing of fuel cells and fuel cell systems. The annual funding level was about $4 million which allows the UH to garner a national expertise of value to the U.S. Navy and transferable technology to the civilian sector. With this basic investment, the UH has been able to compete for additional funding. Today funding levels from the Navy are approaching $5 million annually.

With an expanded Navy interest in alternative energy, together with additional funding I am supporting, new tasks will include perfection of an ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchanger, better energy storage and management technologies to facilitate greater use of renewable energy resources including wind and solar.

Hawaii Center for Advanced Transportation Technologies (HCATT). In the late 1990's, HCATT was established to research and test a host of electric vehicle, hybrid and battery technologies. The annual funding base was about $3 million. In 2004, the Air Force brought the first hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicle to Hawaii, and the program turned its attention to the use of hydrogen as a new energy medium. Hickam Air Force base has become the national Air Force leader in the development of hydrogen based technology. Hickam leads the State's efforts in this area as well.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Environment
Oceans

NOAA provides key services from forecasting wave sets for surfing, ensuring that the sashimi we eat is fresh and safe, to developing an increasingly mature understanding of our oceans. NOAA serves an integral role in daily island living and is in the process of standing up a regional presence in Hawaii. Construction funding of $156.8 million will allow for all of the different components of NOAA to be located in one building, enabling smoother communications and delivery of valuable services to the public. NOAA currently has three ships and about 500 employees in Hawaii.

Coral Reef Ecosystems. Hawaii and the territorial Pacific are stewards of much of the coral reef habitat in the United States, including the most unexplored coral reefs contained within the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Even though coral reefs account for less than one percent of the ocean, they account for more than 50% of the livable habitat in the ocean. $20.9 million in funding has supported research to conserve coral reef ecosystems.

Marine Debris and Weather Buoys. From natural hazards and environmental contaminants to marine debris and land management, there are many challenges to keep Hawaii's coastal lands " where we live, work and play " clean and protected. Funding of $59.6 million was used to clean up debris on both land and sea, purchase critical areas for conservation and better understand the path of natural hazards such as tsunamis.

Aquaculture. U.S. demand for fish as part of a healthy diet far exceeds what wild fish populations can sustain. As a result, the U.S. imports more than 70% of our seafood. A recent economic study shows that aquaculture has the potential to provide tens of thousands of jobs and add hundreds of millions of dollars to coastal economies over the next 10-15 years.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

National Forests and Healthy Forests Initiative

James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge. Over the years, the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge expansion has been a huge undertaking. It is a protected haven for four endangered Hawaiian waterbirds, as well as a variety of migratory shorebirds and water fowl that use the coastal wetlands. Other wildlife include the pueo or Hawaiian owl, the Hawaiian monk seal, and green sea turtles.

Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest. As the number of forest acres continues to grow on the Big Island, the Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest serves as an important resource. This project remains a priority.

Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge. Over the years, significant federal funds have been appropriated to establish and then expand the Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge, including the restoration of the Hanalei Bridge, on the Island of Kauai.

Kahuku Ranch on the Big Island. Over the last 10 years, $22 million was secured for the National Park Service's 116,000-acre purchase of Kahuku Ranch on the Big Island, making it the largest acquisition in recent times. Six rare and endangered bird and mammal species are now be protected and preserved. This is the newest addition to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Park. Pu'uhonua O Honaunau National Historic Park on the Big Island is a culturally rich park full of ancient heiau, kii, holua slides and other historical features. $4.6 million was appropriated to purchase an additional 239 acres, more than doubling the size of this culturally historical park.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

National Parks

$8.6 million will be used to replace the administrative headquarters for Kealia Pond National Wildlife Refuge on Maui which was destroyed by a fire. Kilauea Volcano remains very active, and in order to monitor both Kilauea and Mauna Loa, funds were provided to update and modernize equipment to ensure greater accuracy for earlier warning.

James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge. Over the years, the James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge expansion has been a huge undertaking. Since 1999, $15.7 million has been appropriated to acquire the 1,100 acres located in the northern part of Oahu. It is a protected haven for four endangered Hawaiian waterbirds, as well as a variety of migratory shorebirds and water fowl that use the coastal wetlands. Other wildlife include the pueo or Hawaiian owl, the Hawaiian monk seal, and green sea turtles.

Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest. As the number of forest acres continues to grow on the Big Island, the Hawaii Experimental Tropical Forest serves as an important resource. Currently, a biological research and education center has been designed at a cost of $3.2 million. Construction funds are being requested to complete the project ($7 million). This project remains a priority.

Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge. Over the years, significant federal funds have been appropriated to establish and then expand the Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Hanalei National Wildlife Refuge, including the restoration of the Hanalei Bridge, on the Island of Kauai.

Kahuku Ranch on the Big Island. Over the last 10 years, $22 million was secured for the National Park Service's 116,000-acre purchase of Kahuku Ranch on the Big Island, making it the largest acquisition in recent times. This is the newest addition to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Land, Rivers and Lakes

I support preserving lands by federal purchase such as the Volcanoes National Park and the City of Refuge on the Big Island, Haleakala National Park and Kealia Wildlife Refuge on Maui, Kilauea Lighthouse on Kauai and the James Campbell Refuge on Oahu.

I also support public-private partnerships to protect special lands through either a purchase of fee title or a conservation easement. Recent examples include: Waimea Valley, Kawainui Marsh, Pupukea-Paumalu, Moanalua Valley, Muolea Point, Waihee Preserve, and very shortly the Honouliuli Preserve located along the Waianae mountain range. All of these efforts are critical to ensure that future generations can enjoy and experience Hawaii's beauty with all of their senses, and not from picture books on a coffee table.

Over the years, the U.S. Army, through its Army Compatible Use Buffer program, has been a partner in many of the public-partnerships to conserve special lands. It has invested more than $7.7 million to help acquire Waimea Valley, Pupukea-Paumalu, Moanalua Valley, and another $2.6 million to help acquire the Honouliuli preserve in the near future.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Clean Water Act and Water Quality

Safe drinking water and wastewater infrastructure projects were a priority in the President's stimulus proposal. These projects will both create jobs and upgrade needed infrastructure. $50.1 million in stimulus funds from the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Water State Revolving Fund and Drinking Water State Revolving Fund programs will be sent to Hawaii. Hawaii's annual allocation from both these programs is about $15.5 million.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Invasive Species

Vertebrate pests are not only a major threat to Hawaii's endangered species, but to our fragile ecosystems. Should the brown tree snake population from Guam establish itself in Hawaii, it would be a major ecological disaster. Hawaii's unique biodiversity is at stake. More that $36.1 million has been invested in a host of brown tree snake eradication and prevention strategies via the Departments of Agriculture, Defense and Interior. Today, the Departments of Defense and Interior have included funds for brown tree snake prevention into their base budgets.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Endangered Species

Endangered Species. Green sea turtles and other turtles in Hawaii are fully protected under the Endangered Species Act. Nearly $60 million for Hawaiian sea turtles helps protect this endangered species. Fisheries in Hawaii have long had a negative impact on the turtle population. This funding has allowed for new fishing gear that minimizes the accidental catch of turtles during fishing operations, as well as support for propagation.

Hawaiian Monk Seal. The Hawaiian monk seal is the most endangered seal in the United States. $10.6 million in funding has resulted in critical support for monitoring the monk seal population in both the Main and Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It has also been used to identify the factors that stand in the way of species recovery. I am committed because much more needs to be done to keep the monk seal from extinction.

Fisheries. Hawaii is unique in its natural beauty, both on land and at sea. It is also unique in the diversity and quality of its fish resources. Fish are healthy to eat, provide thousands of jobs, and provide bountiful recreation for the state. $84.5 million in funding over the past 10 years has ensured that Hawaii's fisheries are well-understood, wisely managed, and soundly protected so that both fishing and enjoyment of the resource can continue for generations to come. In addition, $12 million has been provided to support our fishermen who have been confronted with natural disasters, conservation mandates and other barriers to their continued livelihood.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Global Warming, Climate Change

As an island state, the increasing pressures of climate change are felt acutely in Hawaii -- from rising sea levels to changes in fish populations and coral reefs. $24.5 million in funding has allowed Hawaii to be at the forefront of the nation's response to climate change. This includes carbon dioxide observations at Mauna Loa Observatory that proved the rise in atmospheric greenhouse gases, to the climate models at NOAA's Integrated Data and Environmental Applications Center.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Environment, a General Statement

Our Hawaiian Islands are one of America's crown jewels. One third of our nation's endangered species are found only in Hawaii. Our islands span seven of the world's eight climate and habitat types -- from desert heat to snowy mountain tops.

Living here, we recognize a responsibility for our environment not only because it is our home, but also because it is one of our earth's great treasures. Living here, we also recognize the need for a healthy economy to support prosperity for our island community. Balancing the two takes careful thought, and a conscience investment of federal, state, and local resources.

Science provides an important tool for managers of the environment and sustainable communities. Researchers can identify and evaluate best practices for resource management and community development to grow a stable economy that will not come at the cost of harming our environment.

I support preserving lands by federal purchase such as the Volcanoes National Park and the City of Refuge on the Big Island, Haleakala National Park and Kealia Wildlife Refuge on Maui, Kilauea Lighthouse on Kauai and the James Campbell Refuge on Oahu.

I also support public-private partnerships to protect special lands through either a purchase of fee title or a conservation easement.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

The list below represents just some of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) projects that received funds due to Senator Inouye's efforts. These projects provided economic, health, and environmental benefits for the islands.

Drinking Water System, Big Island, $1 million

Lihue Wastewater Treatment Plant, Kauai, $1.5 million

Renewable Resource Management, Big Island, $400,000

Seaweed Control, Maui, $250,000

Waimea Wastewater Treatment Plant Interim Expansion, Kauai, $500,000

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

Financial Crisis
Financial Crisis, a General Statement

Hawaii has not been sheltered from this economic recession. Our unemployment rate of 7.4%, as of May, 2009, has not been this high in a decade, not since December 1997. Our bankruptcies are up, as are our foreclosure rate, although not as great as the national average. In the first quarter of 2009, our hotel occupancy, a key indicator of the health of our tourism industry, fell to 69.9% with Oahu at 72.6%, Maui at 69.2%, Kauai at 65.1% and the Big Island at 58.9%. The break even is generally in the low 60th percentile, depending on the debt service a particular property is carrying, and whether it is a luxury or economy hotel.

However, through it all, we cannot and must not give in to despair, and not give up on our dreams. We are all in the same canoe -- we will rise or sink together. While there is no quick fix or easy answer, let us persevere and lean forward together with determination and optimism for better tomorrows.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/10/2011)

Food & Agriculture
Farm Corporation Subsidies

RETAH. This program, operating under the direction of a private sector oversight committee with business and agricultural experience, provided for public private partnerships to support displaced agricultural workers wishing to embark on farm business careers. The program evolved in its final years to support the deteriorating infrastructure as plantations dissolved. 20,000 acres of former sugar lands was put back into agricultural production, and 1,100 people were employed. RETAH played a pivotal role in a resurgence and expansion of diversified agriculture

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Department of Agriculture

The transformation from large-scale plantation agriculture to a smaller-scale diversified agriculture in Hawaii and the American Pacific requires a strong agriculture research base. Approximately $48 million in federal funds were secured to complete Phase I of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Pacific Basin Agriculture Research Center in Hilo. The Center effectively complements the research efforts provided by state and territorial entities. Plans and funding for Phase II construction (approximately $15.1 million) are on-going.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Agriculture, a General Statement

The basis for many of the advances in Hawaii agriculture is research. This federal assistance I have worked to provide, is in addition to the federal Land Grant funding for agricultural research, extension, and instruction.

RETAH, Agricultural Incubators, and Hawaii Agricultural Development. Three programs which contribute to the growth of diversified agriculture and Hawaii's food security are the Rural Economic Transition Assistance Hawaii (RETAH) program, the Agricultural Incubator program, and Hawaii Agricultural Development program. These programs address the confluence of two main issues -- the decline on plantation agriculture and the release of water and land resources to diversified agriculture; and, the limited history of entrepreneurship in Hawaii's agriculture.

RETAH. This program, operating under the direction of a private sector oversight committee with business and agricultural experience, provided for public private partnerships to support displaced agricultural workers wishing to embark on farm business careers. The program evolved in its final years to support the deteriorating infrastructure as plantations dissolved. 20,000 acres of former sugar lands was put back into agricultural production, and 1,100 people were employed. RETAH played a pivotal role in a resurgence and expansion of diversified agriculture.

Agricultural Incubator Program. This program offers those wishing to engage in farm businesses access to state-of-the-art business management practices and mentoring.

Hawaii Agricultural Development Program. This program supports small public-private partnerships to expand diversified agriculture and improve food security.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/10/2011)

Family Farm

RETAH. This program, operating under the direction of a private sector oversight committee with business and agricultural experience, provided for public private partnerships to support displaced agricultural workers wishing to embark on farm business careers. The program evolved in its final years to support the deteriorating infrastructure as plantations dissolved. 20,000 acres of former sugar lands was put back into agricultural production, and 1,100 people were employed. RETAH played a pivotal role in a resurgence and expansion of diversified agriculture.

Agricultural Incubator Program. This program offers those wishing to engage in farm businesses access to state-of-the-art business management practices and mentoring.

Hawaii Agricultural Development Program. This program supports small public-private partnerships to expand diversified agriculture and improve food security.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Food, a General Statement

The basis for many of the advances in Hawaii agriculture is research. Over the past decade, approximately $128 million in federal funding was provided in support of applied and basic agricultural research in Hawaii. Funds have been provided to the Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, the Hawaii Agricultural Research Center, the University of Hawaii Manoa, the University of Hawaii Hilo, and the Oceanic Institute. This federal assistance I have worked to provide, is in addition to the federal Land Grant funding for agricultural research, extension, and instruction.

Of special note, much of the research effort over the years have been directed to fruit flies -- both growing crops in spite of their presence and developing ways to export agricultural produce that are host to these pests. Research has enabled both options since they affect a wide range of agricultural crops -- not just fruits. The long history of fruit research and control also offer valuable templates for Hawaii growers to deal with other pests.

There are many facets to the research undertaken with these funds with a large portion directed to managing pests and diseases through development of management systems and pest/disease resistance through classical breeding and molecular biology; development of new varieties to meet ever changing markets; and, solving specific production, processing, and marketing problems faced by diversified agricultural producers. In addition to discovering solutions, research findings are transferred to farmers and ranchers through the Hawaii Cooperative Extension Service.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/10/2011)

Farm Subsidies

RETAH. This program, operating under the direction of a private sector oversight committee with business and agricultural experience, provided for public private partnerships to support displaced agricultural workers wishing to embark on farm business careers. The program evolved in its final years to support the deteriorating infrastructure as plantations dissolved. 20,000 acres of former sugar lands was put back into agricultural production, and 1,100 people were employed. RETAH played a pivotal role in a resurgence and expansion of diversified agriculture

Agricultural Incubator Program. This program offers those wishing to engage in farm businesses access to state-of-the-art business management practices and mentoring.

Hawaii Agricultural Development Program. This program supports small public-private partnerships to expand diversified agriculture and improve food security.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Foreign Policy
Foreign Policy, a General Statement

Military might and the physical security provided by our military is complemented by the East-West Center's approach of citizen diplomacy. For 50 years the East-West Center has worked to build stronger relationships in the Asia-Pacific region through education, dialogue, and research. East-West Center's programs educate international students who eventually return to their home countries, and develop an important corps of diplomats who are able to provide a better understanding of the U.S. to their peers. Over $186 million has been invested to establish and sustain this effective corps of diplomats while helping Americans gain a better understanding of their neighbors across the Pacific.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

China, a General Statement

Military might and the physical security provided by our military is complemented by the East-West Center's approach of citizen diplomacy. For 50 years the East-West Center has worked to build stronger relationships in the Asia-Pacific region through education, dialogue, and research. East-West Center's programs educate international students who eventually return to their home countries, and develop an important corps of diplomats who are able to provide a better understanding of the U.S. to their peers. Over $186 million has been invested to establish and sustain this effective corps of diplomats while helping Americans gain a better understanding of their neighbors across the Pacific.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Government
FEMA and Hurricane Katrina

In Hawaii and the Pacific, natural disasters -- hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunami, floods, drought and other catastrophes -- are a constant threat. We have experienced many over the years. Time and time again, Hawaii's people are compassionate, sharing and resilient. I have worked to enhance investments on the front end -- better/earlier warnings so people can prepare and take heed. I am currently working to grow a more comprehensive Federal Emergency Management Agency presence in Hawaii, in concert with the U.S. Coast Guard, to ensure that we are able to more quickly and effectively respond in time of disaster.

Below are some of my security and preparedness accomplishments for Hawaii:

National Disaster Preparedness Training Center.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)--Pacific Operations.

Transportation Security Administration (TSA).

Volcano Hazards Program.

Preparing Hawaii and the Nation for Tsunami.

Pacific Disaster Center (PDC).

Center for Excellence in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance.

Center of Excellence for Maritime Domain Awareness.

The State of Hawaii has and will continue to be confronted by multiple major disasters. The most important actions government can take in time of disaster is first to ensure that people are safe and out of harm's way. Next, it is to get government officials activated and assessing damage so recovery dollars can be disbursed to assist individuals and to rebuild public infrastructure. My responsibility is to see to it that sufficient government resources are available in a timely manner.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Government Agencies

POST SERVICE

The measure urges the Postal Service to develop a procedure by which mail that originates on the same island to which it is addressed can be kept and sorted on that island. The Conferees agreed that the Postal Service would examine the feasibility of implementing procedures that take into account Hawaii's unique geography. This mail sorting issue arose in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack when air travel was temporarily halted between islands.

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

U.S. Postal Service

The measure urges the Postal Service to develop a procedure by which mail that originates on the same island to which it is addressed can be kept and sorted on that island. The Conferees agreed that the Postal Service would examine the feasibility of implementing procedures that take into account Hawaii's unique geography. This mail sorting issue arose in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack when air travel was temporarily halted between islands.

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

Health & Medical
Bird Flu (Avian Influenza)

A possible avian flu epidemic is a national concern. The funding in this appropriations measure will help us to be better prepared by increasing international surveillance, training more emergency officials, and stockpiling vaccines.

I am disappointed, however, that the bill included language that shields pharmaceutical companies that manufacture bird flu vaccines from liability. Americans may refuse to be vaccinated if they fear that drug companies are more concerned about protecting themselves than the public.

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

Health Disparities

Realizing the health disparities in Honolulu's urban core and in rural communities on all of the islands, I have long supported healthcare access for all residents, with or without insurance, by ensuring a growing network of federal Community Health Centers. They target services to medically underserved people including low-income families, Native Hawaiians, immigrants, the homeless, and those who lack health insurance. To date, 14 Community Health Centers with 47 service sites, serving over 117,000 patients per year, are up and running on the Islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and the Big Island. The annual average aggregate federal subsidy for these 14 centers is about $15.7 million. In addition, I support another $1.8 million annually in congressional initiatives to make investments in their healthcare delivery systems, jump-starting or expanding high demand areas such as dental and mental health services. Most recently, $2.7 million dollars in economic stimulus funds was provided to the 14 centers to extend services to more uninsured members of our community. Additional economic stimulus funds are expected shortly to support capital improvements for each of the centers.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Cancer

My involvement in support of cancer research in Hawaii dates back decades. During President Reagan's administration, I spearheaded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Cancer Panel site visit to Hawaii which ultimately led to the creation of the cancer center building on the Queen's Medical Center campus during President Carter's tenure.

In May, 2002, the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Cancer Care in Hawaii found that comprehensive cancer care in Hawaii was poorly coordinated, due to a highly fragmented and competitive healthcare system. Existing cancer screening, cancer care and cancer research initiatives were complicated by Hawaii's geographical isolation and by the State's extraordinary ethnic and socioeconomic diversity.

Wanting to ensure that Hawaii patients could get the best treatment locally, instead of having to travel to the mainland, one of the identified solutions was to establish a new cancer research center. My goal was to spur on this important development. It seems that we are moving much closer to breaking ground and realizing this goal. To support this effort, I secured $10 million in 2004 for the planning and design of a new cancer center in Kakaako, which would expand upon an existing UH facility and add a clinical component for actual patient care and clinical trials.

Also in 2004, I worked to secure an additional $8.5 million for a collaboration between Tripler and the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii to work on the causes and optimum treatment of cancer. The research projects, started as a result of this funding, are still ongoing and reporting substantial increases in patients enrolled in clinical trials, which offer the most cutting edge drugs and treatment plans.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Children's Health

For 25 years, I have spearheaded legislation and funding for the Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) program which is designed to ensure that all children and adolescents, no matter where they live, receive appropriate care in a health emergency. Since its establishment, the EMSC Program has provided grant funding to all 50 states. $20 million dollars in annual funding has been used to help transform pediatric emergency care in a range of areas, including training EMTs how to care for ill and injured children, developing lists of equipment and drugs that should be in ambulances and in hospitals, and developing handbooks and tools for providers to use in caring for children. Since the program was created in 1984, the rates of child death from unintentional injuries have dropped by 40 percent, due in part to improved emergency care. The State Department of Health is the recipient of Hawaii's allocation of funds for this program.

Pediatric ECMO -- Hanuola. ECMO stands for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and it is the temporary support of heart and/or lung function using mechanical devices. With an investment of $6 million, a sustainable partnership was established in July, 2007 between Tripler, Kapiolani Medical Center, Kaiser Permanente, and the University of Hawaii to provide very sick children with a state of the art lifesaving technique. Nine children have been saved with ECMO-Hanuola.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Public Health Workers

The College of Pharmacy program will begin graduating about 90 doctorally prepared pharmacists annually beginning in 2011. The inaugural class was seated in 2007, and currently, about 115 students are enrolled, including at least 23 via distance learning. Once completed, the pharmacy programs at UHH are projected to generate $50 million per year in economic activity for the state, $4.2 million in tuition revenue per academic year for the university, and another $15 million in earnings.

A pre-pharmacy program was also established to meet the needs of students in the Pacific Region who may not have access to formal training opportunities. Realizing that many students do not have campus access due to geographical or transportation barriers, student access was increased through enhanced partnerships and distance-learning efforts. The pre-pharmacy program is offered to students in American Samoa, Guam, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Northern Marianas College, Saipan, and Palau. In addition to fulfilling the two-year requirement of pre-pharmacy training, the curriculum is designed to fulfill some or all of the prerequisites for other health science degrees such as nursing and medicine.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Rural Health Care

Realizing the health disparities in Honolulu's urban core and in rural communities on all of the islands, I have long supported healthcare access for all residents, with or without insurance, by ensuring a growing network of federal Community Health Centers. They target services to medically underserved people including low-income families, Native Hawaiians, immigrants, the homeless, and those who lack health insurance. To date, 14 Community Health Centers with 47 service sites, serving over 117,000 patients per year, are up and running on the Islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and the Big Island. The annual average aggregate federal subsidy for these 14 centers is about $15.7 million. In addition, I support another $1.8 million annually in congressional initiatives to make investments in their healthcare delivery systems, jump-starting or expanding high demand areas such as dental and mental health services. Most recently, $2.7 million dollars in economic stimulus funds was provided to the 14 centers to extend services to more uninsured members of our community. Additional economic stimulus funds are expected shortly to support capital improvements for each of the centers.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Improving Health & Medical Care

Community Health Centers. I have long supported healthcare access for all residents, with or without insurance, by ensuring a growing network of federal Community Health Centers.

Emergency Medical Services for Children. For 25 years, I have spearheaded legislation and funding for the EMSC program which is designed to ensure that all children and adolescents, no matter where they live, receive appropriate care in a health emergency.

Administration on Aging Grants. I have facilitated $20 million in funding over 10 years for the Administration on Aging grants to Native Hawaiian organizations.

Pharmacy and Pre-Pharmacy Programs at University of Hawaii at Hilo (UHH).

The College of Pharmacy program will begin graduating about 90 doctorally prepared pharmacists annually beginning in 2011.

Papa Ola Lokahi - Native Hawaiian Healthcare. Providing quality healthcare services to Native Hawaiians has always been critical.

Akamai. Akamai supports applied research, development and deployment of telehealth and healthcare technology, biotechnology, and clinical informatics, to improve access and the quality of care to military families, federal beneficiaries and impacted communities.

Pediatric ECMO -- Hanuola. ECMO stands for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and it is the temporary support of heart and/or lung function using mechanical devices.

Cancer Research Center of Hawaii. I secured $10 million in 2004 for the planning and design of a new cancer center in Kakaako. Also in 2004, I worked to secure an additional $8.5 million for a collaboration between Tripler and the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Health & Medical Care, a General Statement

Which is the bigger issue in healthcare today: spiraling costs or accessing quality care regardless of whether you live in an urban or rural community? Hawaii faces both challenges. With federal support, we have a spectrum of solutions. Federal community health centers provide quality healthcare to those in need. Moreover, telehealth utilizes internet and broadband connections to bring specialists to rural community hospitals and health centers. The new University of Hawaii at Hilo pharmacy school trains a new generation of practitioners for our communities. On tough issues like these, there is only one way forward: together.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Medical Research

Akamai supports applied research, development and deployment of telehealth and healthcare technology, biotechnology, and clinical informatics, to improve access and the quality of care to military families, federal beneficiaries and impacted communities. Building on an annual investment of approximately $25 million, this project has been successful in advancing the development of clinical diagnostic systems, regenerative medicine, human physiology sensors, medical information systems, medical simulation, vaccine development, clinical research in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other biotechnology and medical projects. Through this effort, Hawaii technology companies have succeeded and new technologies and services are in the marketplace.

My involvement in support of cancer research in Hawaii dates back decades. During President Reagan's administration, I spearheaded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Cancer Panel site visit to Hawaii which ultimately led to the creation of the cancer center building on the Queen's Medical Center campus during President Carter's tenure.

In May, 2002, the Governor's Blue Ribbon Panel on Cancer Care in Hawaii found that comprehensive cancer care in Hawaii was poorly coordinated, due to a highly fragmented and competitive healthcare system. Wanting to ensure that Hawaii patients could get the best treatment locally, instead of having to travel to the mainland, one of the identified solutions was to establish a new cancer research center. To support this effort, I secured $10 million in 2004 for the planning and design of a new cancer center in Kakaako.

Also in 2004, I worked to secure an additional $8.5 million for a collaboration between Tripler and the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii to work on the causes and optimum treatment of cancer.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Realizing the health disparities in Honolulu's urban core and in rural communities on all of the islands, I have long supported healthcare access for all residents, with or without insurance, by ensuring a growing network of federal Community Health Centers. They target services to medically underserved people including low-income families, Native Hawaiians, immigrants, the homeless, and those who lack health insurance. To date, 14 Community Health Centers with 47 service sites, serving over 117,000 patients per year, are up and running on the Islands of Kauai, Oahu, Molokai, Lanai, Maui, and the Big Island. The annual average aggregate federal subsidy for these 14 centers is about $15.7 million. In addition, I support another $1.8 million annually in congressional initiatives to make investments in their healthcare delivery systems, jump-starting or expanding high demand areas such as dental and mental health services. Most recently, $2.7 million dollars in economic stimulus funds was provided to the 14 centers to extend services to more uninsured members of our community. Additional economic stimulus funds are expected shortly to support capital improvements for each of the centers.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Elderly's Health

I have facilitated $20 million in funding over 10 years for the Administration on Aging grants to Native Hawaiian organizations. This funding promotes the delivery of supportive programs, including nutrition services, to older Native Hawaiians and provides multifaceted systems of support services to family caregivers.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

National Security & Terrorism
Torture of Terrorists

"I am pleased that this legislation includes language that prohibits abusive interrogations of suspected terrorists, and clarifies current anti-torture laws," said Senator Inouye, the Ranking Member of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, who during House-Senate negotiations vigorously fought White House-backed efforts to remove the provision. "While we must do our best to protect our nation from foreign terrorists and all other enemies, we must ensure that we, as a nation, do not engage in the sort of conduct that dishonors our democratic ideals."

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

Homes
Housing, a General Statement

The availability of adequate and affordable housing has oftentimes been a challenge in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development annually provides about $126.8 million to the state and counties to support their public housing areas, and their need for affordable housing on their respective islands. These funds come in the form of tenant-based vouchers, investment partnerships, operating and capital improvement monies.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Low Income Housing

The Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program and Native Hawaiian Loan Guarantee Fund program were established to provide support to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands for home construction and renovations, as well as to provide assistance to more families on the path to homeownership. Over the past 10 years, $82.3 million has been appropriated for these programs combined. With these funds, new communities have been established, more families have gotten homes, and the Department continues its mission to provide homes to more on the waiting list.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Homeownership

The availability of adequate and affordable housing has oftentimes been a challenge in Hawaii. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development annually provides about $126.8 million to the state and counties to support their public housing areas, and their need for affordable housing on their respective islands. These funds come in the form of tenant-based vouchers, investment partnerships, operating and capital improvement monies.

The Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program and Native Hawaiian Loan Guarantee Fund program were established to provide support to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands for home construction and renovations, as well as to provide assistance to more families on the path to homeownership. Over the past 10 years, $82.3 million has been appropriated for these programs combined. With these funds, new communities have been established, more families have gotten homes, and the Department continues its mission to provide homes to more on the waiting list.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Community Development

Hawaii annually receives about $14.9 million, divided between the counties to support community development. Appropriated funds have been the catalyst for local economic development by providing job training, access to equipment and facilities for entrepreneurs and small businesses, and contributing to the growth strategy powered by local communities. Examples of economic development projects benefiting the low income and working families include the West Kauai High Tech Training Facility, Kipahulu certified kitchen, Pacific Gateway Center Business Incubator, and the Goodwill Leeward Job and Training Center.

Moreover, a healthy community also needs facilities for social services and safe housing. Projects for community development and housing support include the Lanai Youth Center, Kuhio Park Terrace Community Resource Center, Filipino Community Center, Boys and Girls Clubs, The Arc of Hilo support center, Catholic Charities Community Services facilities, Momilani Adult Day Care Center, Children's Justice Center, Waipahu Community Association, Iao Theater in Wailuku, the Maui Academy of Performing Arts, Kaloko Housing for homeless families, youth center in Milolii, and increasing the number of Hawaii public housing units available at Lanakila Homes and Kalihi Valley Homes.

The Departments of Agriculture, Education, and Housing and Urban Development each administer an Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions program. Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions such as Chaminade University, University of Hawaii at Hilo, and all of the community colleges under the University of Hawaii system have received a total of $83.1 million over the past 10 years. Programs are not limited to Native Hawaiian initiatives but rather support programs and students across the board.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Subprime Mortgage Crisis

Hawaii has not been sheltered from this economic recession. Our unemployment rate of 7.4%, as of May, 2009, has not been this high in a decade, not since December 1997. Our bankruptcies are up, as are our foreclosure rate, although not as great as the national average. In the first quarter of 2009, our hotel occupancy, a key indicator of the health of our tourism industry, fell to 69.9% with Oahu at 72.6%, Maui at 69.2%, Kauai at 65.1% and the Big Island at 58.9%. The break even is generally in the low 60th percentile, depending on the debt service a particular property is carrying, and whether it is a luxury or economy hotel.

However, through it all, we cannot and must not give in to despair, and not give up on our dreams. We are all in the same canoe -- we will rise or sink together. While there is no quick fix or easy answer, let us persevere and lean forward together with determination and optimism for better tomorrows.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/10/2011)

Affordable Housing

The Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program and Native Hawaiian Loan Guarantee Fund program were established to provide support to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands for home construction and renovations, as well as to provide assistance to more families on the path to homeownership. Over the past 10 years, $82.3 million has been appropriated for these programs combined. With these funds, new communities have been established, more families have gotten homes, and the Department continues its mission to provide homes to more on the waiting list.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Illegal Drugs & Marijuana
Illegal Drugs, a General Statement

The Hawaii High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) received its designation in 1999 from the Office of National Drug Control Policy in response to rising rates of crystal methamphetamine abuse in the state. HIDTA's priorities include: intelligence, investigation, interdiction, prosecution, and support. With an annual budget of about $1.2 million, the Hawaii HIDTA provides technical and tactical training, pools technological and equipment resources, and coordinates the efforts of law enforcement agencies operating within the region. This includes the execution of all wiretap operations, the sharing of tips on critical information from informants, and coordinated busts which have been successful in disrupting drug trafficking linked to Asia, Oceania and the Pacific.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Military & Defense
Military Families

Impact Aid. Hawaii receives about $37 million annually in Impact Aid payments. It is the federal government's method of compensating states for the additional duty of educating the children of military dependents. Because this is not a responsibility shared equally by all states, Impact Aid payments are intended to help reduce (but not alleviate) the economic burden placed on states with large number of military dependents, like Hawaii.

Joint Venture Education Forum (JVEF). Over the past 10 years, $53 million has been invested by the Department of Defense in the JVEF which is a partnership between the military's Pacific Command and the Hawaii Department of Education to support the needs of both military dependents in public schools, and provide additional resources to schools with a significant military presence. JVEF welcomes our military community to be active partners in Hawaii's public schools, and to work together toward the common goal of a quality education for all our children. Initiatives include Hawaii 3R's, Project ASSIST, technology, textbook and playground support, curriculum programs, and partnerships with 168 public schools.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Military, a General Statement

Security means knowing that our families are safe and our homes protected. These simple concerns are paramount. In Hawaii, our communities are resilient, and we grow up learning to look out for each other. With federal support and investment, we are better able to prepare, protect and recover -- and then to take a leadership role in the U.S. Pacific region.

From a defense standpoint, Hawaii serves as the Pacific headquarters to all the military services -- Navy, Army, Air Force and Marines. The Asia Pacific region is a hot spot, and a growing area of strategic and diplomatic focus. For example, 7 of the 10 largest military forces reside in this region; major increases in commerce and trade are occurring in the Pacific. For these reasons, Hawaii's strategic location plays a key role in the positioning of our nation's military into the Asia Pacific. Our military focus is to support our allies, and to send a message to those with mischief on their minds. The best way to prevent war is to be prepared for war.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Defense and Military Budget

Below are some of my security and preparedness accomplishments for Hawaii:

U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM). PACOM's vast area of responsibility includes Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and Oceania. PACOM is supported by the U.S. Army Pacific, U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Pacific Air Forces, and U.S. Marine Forces Pacific, armed with the latest equipment available to the U.S. military.

Stryker Brigade Combat Team. This state-of-the-art Army system is capable of rapid combat ready deployment, and gives our service members the best advantage on both close-combat urban terrain and open terrain battlefields.

Pearl Harbor. Pearl Harbor Naval Station and Shipyard both have played a key role in the history of our national defense.

Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). PMRF, located on the Island of Kauai, features the military's latest technology in protecting both Hawaii and the U.S. from the threat of ballistic missile attacks.

F-22. Through my support of our forces' ability to respond to immediate threats, the F-22 Raptor will be added to the broad-spectrum of dominant air assets the U.S. enjoys.

C-17. I have worked to secure over $106 million to support the Air Forces' receipt of 40 C-17 crews based in Hawaii.

Coast Guard Command and Control Center in Honolulu. I am supporting a Coast Guard investment of $36 million for a new Command and Control Center on Sand Island.

14th District Coast Guard Pacific Assets. Hawaii and the Pacific region are at times looked at as possible "back door" entry points for terrorists and criminals to the United States.

Port of Honolulu Security. To keep our seagoing trade as safe and secure as possible, the SAFE Port Act (Security and Accountability for Every Port) was passed during my tenure as Chair of the Commerce Committee.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

African, Latino & Native Americans
Native American Rights

Providing quality healthcare services to Native Hawaiians has always been critical. Cancer, diabetes, and heart disease continue to plague the Native Hawaiians at a greater rate than all other ethnic groups. Early health prevention and promotion greatly improve the chances of providing proper treatment to increase their longevity. Over the years I have secured over $115 million for Native Hawaiian healthcare. These funds have been used to provide preventative care, traditional healing practices, and general health services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Native Americans in American Society

Providing quality healthcare services to Native Hawaiians has always been critical. Cancer, diabetes, and heart disease continue to plague the Native Hawaiians at a greater rate than all other ethnic groups. Early health prevention and promotion greatly improve the chances of providing proper treatment to increase their longevity. Over the years I have secured over $115 million for Native Hawaiian healthcare. These funds have been used to provide preventative care, traditional healing practices, and general health services.

The Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program and Native Hawaiian Loan Guarantee Fund program were established to provide support to the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands for home construction and renovations, as well as to provide assistance to more families on the path to homeownership. Over the past 10 years, $82.3 million has been appropriated for these programs combined. With these funds, new communities have been established, more families have gotten homes, and the Department continues its mission to provide homes to more on the waiting list.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Native Americans, a General Statement

Multiple legislative achievements for the Native Hawaiians, including:

Kahoolawe Restoration

Kuhio Park Terrace Community Resource Center

Native Hawaiian Culture and Arts Program

Native Hawaiian Education Act

Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act

Native Hawaiian Housing Loan Guarantee Fund

Native Hawaiian Institutions Assisting Communities Program

Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund

Native Hawaiian Vocational Education

Pacific Community Development Program and Fishery Demonstration Projects

Repatriation of Remains at Kaneohe Bay

Samoan/Asian Pacific Islander Job Training

Sustainable Agriculture in the American Pacific

The Pacific Islands Center for Educational Development

Title III of the Higher Education Act, Strengthening Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions

Providing quality healthcare services to Native Hawaiians has always been critical. Cancer, diabetes, and heart disease continue to plague the Native Hawaiians at a greater rate than all other ethnic groups. Early health prevention and promotion greatly improve the chances of providing proper treatment to increase their longevity. Over the years I have secured over $115 million for Native Hawaiian healthcare. These funds have been used to provide preventative care, traditional healing practices, and general health services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Science, Technology & Space
Science, a General Statement

Akamai supports applied research, development and deployment of telehealth and healthcare technology, biotechnology, and clinical informatics, to improve access and the quality of care to military families, federal beneficiaries and impacted communities. Through this effort, Hawaii technology companies have succeeded and new technologies and services are in the marketplace.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). NOAA provides key services from forecasting wave sets for surfing, ensuring that the sashimi we eat is fresh and safe, to developing an increasingly mature understanding of our oceans. NOAA serves an integral role in daily island living and is in the process of standing up a regional presence in Hawaii. Construction funding of $156.8 million will allow for all of the different components of NOAA to be located in one building, enabling smoother communications and delivery of valuable services to the public. NOAA currently has three ships and about 500 employees in Hawaii.

Marine Research. Part of Hawaii's beauty is in its remote nature. As a result however, it is often extremely difficult to get from one place to another, particularly in the vastness of the Pacific Ocean. $37 million was provided for a scientific research vessel, the Hiialakai, to be purchased for coral reef ecosystem mapping, assessment, and monitoring, as well as the refurbishment of another research vessel. In addition, these funds allowed for proper maintenance and construction of scientific structures necessary for conducting critical marine science research, monitoring and education.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Science and Technology Research and Development

The basis for many of the advances in Hawaii agriculture is research. Over the past decade, approximately $128 million in federal funding was provided in support of applied and basic agricultural research in Hawaii. Funds have been provided to the Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, the Hawaii Agricultural Research Center, the University of Hawaii Manoa, the University of Hawaii Hilo, and the Oceanic Institute. This federal assistance I have worked to provide, is in addition to the federal Land Grant funding for agricultural research, extension, and instruction.

Of special note, much of the research effort over the years have been directed to fruit flies -- both growing crops in spite of their presence and developing ways to export agricultural produce that are host to these pests. Research has enabled both options since they affect a wide range of agricultural crops -- not just fruits. The long history of fruit research and control also offer valuable templates for Hawaii growers to deal with other pests.

Akamai supports applied research, development and deployment of telehealth and healthcare technology, biotechnology, and clinical informatics, to improve access and the quality of care to military families, federal beneficiaries and impacted communities. Building on an annual investment of approximately $25 million, this project has been successful in advancing the development of clinical diagnostic systems, regenerative medicine, human physiology sensors, medical information systems, medical simulation, vaccine development, clinical research in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and other biotechnology and medical projects. Through this effort, Hawaii technology companies have succeeded and new technologies and services are in the marketplace.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Transportation
Air

Hawaii annually receives about $28 million to support the Airport Improvement Program which supports construction and new equipment upgrades for all of Hawaii's airports. The Transportation Security Administration also provides funds for security screening systems at the airports. In the economic stimulus package, $63.8 million was provided for explosive detection systems at Honolulu, Kahului, Hilo and Lihue airports. One of the priority projects is the construction of a new air traffic control tower for the Kona airport; planning and design has been completed and the construction has been budgeted.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Seaports

Kaumalapau Harbor Basin. The Island of Lanai is extremely dependent on barge traffic for its supplies, and it has only one harbor, Kaumalapau, that receives supply-carrying barges. Storms over the past 25 years caused significant damage to the rubble-mound breakwater that protects the Kaumalapau Harbor Basin. Once 400-feet long and a decent barrier to rough seas and surge conditions, the breakwater eroded to half its length. A total of $24.7 million in federal funds were secured to improve harbor safety and usability for the people of Lanai.

The Kikiaola Small Boat Harbor. The Kikiaola Small Boat Harbor improvement project on the Island of Kauai was initiated more than 28 years ago. Improvements to the harbor strengthen harbor safety by eliminating dangerous breaking wave conditions within the entrance channel and allow safe passage of vessels entering the basin. More than $22 million in federal funds were secured to ensure a higher level of navigational safety for the people of Kauai.

Kohala Irrigation System. The Kohala irrigation system on the Big Island was severely damaged during the earthquake that rocked the state on October 15, 2006. Emergency funds in the amount of $2 million were secured to repair the irrigation system which is the lifeblood of the Kohala community.

Hamakua Coast Irrigation Flumes. Following the closure of Hamakua Sugar in 1992, the plantation-built and maintained irrigation system fell into disrepair putting many diversified farmers along the Hamakua and Hilo coasts in jeopardy of losing their water supply. Millions of dollars have been invested to develop a reservoir and to shore up the flumes; most recently $1.17 million was provided to continue this important agricultural infrastructure investment.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Federal Infrastructure & Transportation Funding

Federal Highway Formula Funds. Hawaii annually receives about $130 million in federal highway formula funds to support the State of Hawaii and the four counties. Local funds pay 20 percent and the federal funds pay 80 percent to improve and build new roads and highways. The economic stimulus package provided another $127 million in highway funds to both create more jobs and upgrade infrastructure. Over the last 10 years, the federal government invested $200.4 million which highlights the significant role basic transportation infrastructure plays in the economic development of our state by creating construction related jobs, and its essential role in sustaining our military's readiness.

County Buses. Hawaii annually receives about $31 million to support the City and County of Honolulu's The Bus. An additional $40.6 million was provided for this purpose in the economic stimulus package. These federal funds will help rural communities cope with the high cost of fuel and reduce traffic congestion.

Transportation Infrastructure Projects. Over the last 10 years, Hawaii has received in excess of $210 million for a host of transportation infrastructure projects that enable Hawaii's residents in rural and urban areas safe and better access to work, school, and recreation. In addition, the Federal Lands Program builds roads to and within wildlife refuges, national parks and other significant non-military federal property.

Airport Improvement Program. Hawaii annually receives about $28 million to support the Airport Improvement Program which supports construction and new equipment upgrades for all of Hawaii's airports. The Transportation Security Administration also provides funds for security screening systems at the airports. In the economic stimulus package, $63.8 million was provided for explosive detection systems at Honolulu, Kahului, Hilo and Lihue airports.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Transportation, a General Statement

It may not sound particularly exciting or grand, but "infrastructure" connects our islands to each other and to the world. It also connects people with jobs today, and our children to the future. Roads and highways mean that families can visit each other safely, and that goods and services can flow freely from one side of an island to the other. Harbors receive cargo shipments from the mainland which are then distributed to every island by ocean. Airports make travel possible between the islands, to the mainland, and the world. Building, maintaining, and operating these facilities means jobs and the safe transit of cargo and people. The federal funds I have championed serve these goals for all our communities.

Energy and water are also part of our infrastructure picture. Hawaii faces unique challenges in both areas. We are largely dependent on the oil and gas we import to Hawaii. This dependency can and must change, as we strive to harness the wind, sun, ocean, volcano, and agricultural crops to produce electricity on a large scale. I have secured federal funds to research every possible renewable and clean energy option to help Hawaii pave the way to greater energy independence.

Today, the acceleration of technology continues at an exponential pace -- faster, smaller, more applications. With our non-contiguous nature, Hawaii has been in the lead in distance learning and rural telehealth use. Information technology is an area where Hawaii can be competitive because innovative work can be done anywhere, providing that there is significant broadband connectivity. For this reason, I continue to support significant federal investments in science and technology initiatives, and an information superhighway for Hawaii.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Highways

Federal Highway Formula Funds. Hawaii annually receives about $130 million in federal highway formula funds to support the State of Hawaii and the four counties. Local funds pay 20 percent and the federal funds pay 80 percent to improve and build new roads and highways. The economic stimulus package provided another $127 million in highway funds to both create more jobs and upgrade infrastructure. In addition to these formula funds, dollars have been specifically set aside for priority projects on all islands. For example, federal support for the construction of Saddle Road ensures the safety of both public motorists and military users of this important artery on the Big Island. Over the last 10 years, the federal government invested $200.4 million which highlights the significant role basic transportation infrastructure plays in the economic development of our state by creating construction related jobs, and its essential role in sustaining our military's readiness.

County Buses. Hawaii annually receives about $31 million to support the City and County of Honolulu's The Bus. An additional $40.6 million was provided for this purpose in the economic stimulus package. Moreover, Maui, Kauai, and Hawaii Counties regularly receive capital funding for the purchase of buses and installation of bus stops to meet growing public transportation needs. These federal funds will help rural communities cope with the high cost of fuel and reduce traffic congestion.

Transportation Infrastructure Projects. Over the last 10 years, Hawaii has received in excess of $210 million for a host of transportation infrastructure projects that enable Hawaii's residents in rural and urban areas safe and better access to work, school, and recreation. This includes transit, buses, ferry, and targeted federal roads. In addition, the Federal Lands Program builds roads to and within wildlife refuges, national parks and other significant non-military federal property.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Veterans
Homeless Veterans

The impacts of combat are not restricted to the fighting man or woman, and their spouses. Families also feel the strains of our warriors' sacrifices, as evidenced by the numbers of divorce, substance abuse, and homeless veterans.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Veterans, a General Statement

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. At Congress' insistence, a concerted effort was made to help facilitate a smoother transition for our warriors from active duty to civilian life. This included compelling closer coordination between DOD and VA on medical records, service records, and receipt of benefits. The impacts of combat are not restricted to the fighting man or woman, and their spouses. Families also feel the strains of our warriors' sacrifices, as evidenced by the numbers of divorce, substance abuse, and homeless veterans.

Currently, efforts are underway to address the signature wounds of our engagements in OEF/OIF -- traumatic brain injury and psychological health. Ensuring that there are an adequate number of DOD mental health providers to both our service members is critical to helping them cope with the experiences of war. As veterans, meeting the physical and mental needs of our brave men and women becomes the responsibility of the VA. As a result, Congressional funding for both DOD and VA mental health treatment and research have steadily increased. The VA now focuses some of its research efforts on the long-term effects of physical and mental wounds to improve treatments and their efficacy on our veterans.

Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home officially opened in November 2007, and recently received their VA certification. To build the first state-run veterans' home in Hilo, $18 million in federal support for the $28 million construction project was secured. The new 95-bed facility is located next to the Hilo Hospital provides affordable long-term care to our heroes, with an area dedicated to adult daycare services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

GI Bill & Veterans' Benefits

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. At Congress' insistence, a concerted effort was made to help facilitate a smoother transition for our warriors from active duty to civilian life. This included compelling closer coordination between DOD and VA on medical records, service records, and receipt of benefits. The impacts of combat are not restricted to the fighting man or woman, and their spouses. Families also feel the strains of our warriors' sacrifices, as evidenced by the numbers of divorce, substance abuse, and homeless veterans.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Veterans Administration (VA)

The Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC), attends to the medical needs of our fighting men and women. It also shares space with the Spark M. Matsunaga Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, which provides outpatient services to Hawaii's veterans. Hawaii has a proud tradition of service to our nation and is reflected in the number of veterans -- 118,017 -- that reside in the State. In Fiscal Year 2008, over 14,433 veterans utilized the facilities located in Honolulu, and on our neighbor islands, over 5,700 veterans used the VA's outpatient clinics. Statewide, the total number of visits to VA facilities was over 20,000 during Fiscal Year 2008. Over the last two years, Congress has provided more funding to the VA than it has in the last 12 previous years to ensure a higher level of care.

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. This included compelling closer coordination between DOD and VA on medical records, service records, and receipt of benefits.

As veterans, meeting the physical and mental needs of our brave men and women becomes the responsibility of the VA. As a result, Congressional funding for both DOD and VA mental health treatment and research have steadily increased. The VA now focuses some of its research efforts on the long-term effects of physical and mental wounds to improve treatments and their efficacy on our veterans.

Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home officially opened in November 2007, and recently received their VA certification. To build the first state-run veterans' home in Hilo, $18 million in federal support for the $28 million construction project was secured. The new 95-bed facility is located next to the Hilo Hospital provides affordable long-term care to our heroes, with an area dedicated to adult daycare services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Disability Claims

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. This included compelling closer coordination between DOD and VA on medical records, service records, and receipt of benefits.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA)

The Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC), attends to the medical needs of our fighting men and women. It also shares space with the Spark M. Matsunaga Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center, which provides outpatient services to Hawaii's veterans. Hawaii has a proud tradition of service to our nation and is reflected in the number of veterans -- 118,017 -- that reside in the State. In Fiscal Year 2008, over 14,433 veterans utilized the facilities located in Honolulu, and on our neighbor islands, over 5,700 veterans used the VA's outpatient clinics. Statewide, the total number of visits to VA facilities was over 20,000 during Fiscal Year 2008. Over the last two years, Congress has provided more funding to the VA than it has in the last 12 previous years to ensure a higher level of care.

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. This included compelling closer coordination between DOD and VA on medical records, service records, and receipt of benefits.

As veterans, meeting the physical and mental needs of our brave men and women becomes the responsibility of the VA. As a result, Congressional funding for both DOD and VA mental health treatment and research have steadily increased. The VA now focuses some of its research efforts on the long-term effects of physical and mental wounds to improve treatments and their efficacy on our veterans.

Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home officially opened in November 2007, and recently received their VA certification. To build the first state-run veterans' home in Hilo, $18 million in federal support for the $28 million construction project was secured. The new 95-bed facility is located next to the Hilo Hospital provides affordable long-term care to our heroes, with an area dedicated to adult daycare services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Veterans' Health and Medical Care

In Fiscal Year 2008, over 14,433 veterans utilized the facilities located in Honolulu, and on our neighbor islands, over 5,700 veterans used the VA's outpatient clinics. Statewide, the total number of visits to VA facilities was over 20,000 during Fiscal Year 2008. Over the last two years, Congress has provided more funding to the VA than it has in the last 12 previous years.

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. Currently, efforts are underway to address the signature wounds of our engagements in OEF/OIF -- traumatic brain injury and psychological health. Ensuring that there are an adequate number of DOD mental health providers to both our service members is critical to helping them cope with the experiences of war. As veterans, meeting the physical and mental needs of our brave men and women becomes the responsibility of the VA. Following the U.S. experience in Vietnam, psychological conditions suffered by our soldiers like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, were recognized as "legitimate" ailments. Our painful lessons from the Vietnam War remind us that wounds from past conflicts do not end with one's service. As a result, Congressional funding for both DOD and VA mental health treatment and research have steadily increased. The VA now focuses some of its research efforts on the long-term effects of physical and mental wounds to improve treatments and their efficacy on our veterans.

Yukio Okutsu Veterans Home officially opened in November 2007, and recently received their VA certification. To build the first state-run veterans' home in Hilo, $18 million in federal support for the $28 million construction project was secured. The new 95-bed facility is located next to the Hilo Hospital provides affordable long-term care to our heroes, with an area dedicated to adult daycare services.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Vetreran Job Retraining

Upon their return from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), our service members have been receiving improving care from the Department of Defense (DOD) and VA. At Congress' insistence, a concerted effort was made to help facilitate a smoother transition for our warriors from active duty to civilian life.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Brain Injuries (TBI)

Currently, efforts are underway to address the signature wounds of our engagements in OEF/OIF -- traumatic brain injury and psychological health. Ensuring that there are an adequate number of DOD mental health providers to both our service members is critical to helping them cope with the experiences of war. As veterans, meeting the physical and mental needs of our brave men and women becomes the responsibility of the VA. Following the U.S. experience in Vietnam, psychological conditions suffered by our soldiers like Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, were recognized as "legitimate" ailments. Our painful lessons from the Vietnam War remind us that wounds from past conflicts do not end with one's service. As a result, Congressional funding for both DOD and VA mental health treatment and research have steadily increased. The VA now focuses some of its research efforts on the long-term effects of physical and mental wounds to improve treatments and their efficacy on our veterans.

Source: inouye.senate.gov/Working4Hawaii (01/11/2011)

Labor Wages & Unions
Labor, a General Statement

Rural Hawaii Community College Job Training; Rural Development Project

This program, which was introduced by Senator Inouye in 1997, was originally called the Lanai Project and focused on assisting residents of Lanai. It was expanded to assist residents of neighbor islands, and in Fiscal Year 2001, funds were increased to further expand the program to provide assistance to residents of rural communities on Oahu and to help employees of the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai upgrade their job skills. The program, now known as the Rural Hawaii Community College Job Training Program or the Rural Development Project, offers job training, education, employment, and entrpreneurial opportunities. Its goals are to improve the economic and social welfare of rural area residents.

Federal Funds: $16.5 million

Rural Job Training Initiative, Targeted Shortage Areas

These funds will support a new segment of the Rural Development Project that will specifically focus on training people for high-demand positions. The project will develop and implement work programs for people interested in careers as teachers, education specialists, principals, and nurses. It will also support trade and apprenticeships relating to school construction and firefighting.

Source: Candidate Website (10/02/2004)

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